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Test Description and Validation Summaries

Validity

Versant machine-generated scores generally correspond as they should with human ratings. For example, at the overall score level, Versant English Test machine-generated scores are virtually indistinguishable from scoring that is done by careful human transcriptions and repeated independent human judgments. The correlation between the two is 0.97.

The data presented in the figure below shows the correlation between the Versant English Test and human scores.

Over the years, the Versant Test Development team and third parties have collected data on parallel administrations of the Versant English Test and other well-established language examinations, enabling a measure of concurrent validity. Correlations with other instruments for assessing oral skills, which focus mainly or entirely on speaking, range from .75 to .94. The data suggest that the Versant English Test overlaps substantially with that of other instruments designed to assess spoken language skills.

Associated Organizations

The following academic and commercial organizations across North America, Europe and Asia were involved in the development and validation testing of the system.

  • Bologna University, Italy
  • Cañada College, California
  • CITO, National Institute for Educational Measurement, Netherlands
  • CUNY, New York
  • Defense Language Institute English Language Center, Lackland Air Force Base
  • Texas Deloitte and Touche
  • Eastern Michigan University
  • Economics Institute, Boulder, Colorado
  • EF International Language School, Washington
  • Foothill College, Los Altos Hills, California
  • Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong
  • IIBC, Institute for International Business Communication, Japan
  • Indiana University, Indiana
  • Iowa State University, Iowa
  • Lancaster University, UK
  • Monroe Community College, New York
  • Monterey Institute of International Studies, California
  • New York University American Language Institute
  • Oklahoma State University, Oklahoma
  • Patel Institute of English, India
  • Point Loma Nazarene College English Institute, San Diego, California
  • Rainbow Idiomas, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • San Francisco State University American Language Institute
  • Sapporo International University, Japan
  • Sierra Academy of Aeronautics, Oakland, California
  • Stanford University Linguistics Department
  • Teacher Training Institute, Seoul, Korea
  • University of Luton, UK
  • University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Office of International Programs
  • University of Findlay, Ohio
  • University of Pennsylvania, English Language Programs
  • University of Southern Mississippi
  • University of Szeged, Hungary
  • University of York, UK
  • Waseda University, Japan